International Program

Since the Institute has been working mostly in the western US, it might seem odd that the Institute's first project was on an island in the Caribbean. But our staff, board, and advisory board have diverse backgrounds and experience, including a long-standing interest in international conservation.

This is our broadest program, intentionally defined broadly so that we can respond to a wide variety of needs. 

Program Goals

Local girl plays in the surf on Bonaire

Local girl plays in the surf on Bonaire

1. Contribute applied science, collaboration and impact to help resolve conservation and resource management issues where they can make a difference for people and nature.

2. Learn about conservation issues beyond our borders, and the local techniques used to solve them, and where appropriate, exchange information, apply and disseminate these techniques for use in resource management in the US or vice versa.

How Does this program align with Seventh Generation Institute's values?

Entrepreneurial - Applied Science - Monitoring of project results is a key tenet of adaptive management. While not appropriate for all projects, and sometimes out of financial reach, when monitoring can be done, it is a tremendous way to involve local communities in hands-on management of their resources.

Collaboration - In this program, as with all others, the Institute will only work where we are invited and our assistance is wanted. As well, it is key in international work to thoroughly understand all aspects of a situation before initiating actions. Conservation history is full of stories of efforts that were transplanted from one region to another, only to fail as inappropriate socially, financially, or ecologically. 

Impact - Where resources are scarce in developing countries, assistance from the Institute can make a very big impact.

 

Project collaborators

By definition, collaborators will vary from project to project

 

Accomplishments in the program to date

  • 2016 Marine Debris Removal and Turtle Nesting Habitat Improvement - Bonaire
  • 2008 Management Plan - Central Forest Reserve - St. Kitts

2016 Marine debris removal and Turtle nesting habitat improvement - Bonaire

Above: Turtle nesting beach at Boka Washikemba Bonaire before debris removal.

Above: Turtle nesting beach at Boka Washikemba Bonaire before debris removal.

It's about more than a pretty beach. National Geographic reported in 2015 that just the plastic portion of debris blown, tossed and swept into the ocean totals 8 million tons every year. Once there, it's fate is as variable as the ocean winds and waves. Some degrades in sunlight - slowly. Some is pulverized by the action of waves into microscopic pieces, which remain in the water, settle and coat coral reefs. Some drifts and some sinks. Some entangles birds, dolphins and turtles. Some is eaten by marine wildlife with fatal results. While our attention is gripped by images of oil spills and other catastrophes, marine debris is a equally catastrophic but nearly invisible tsunami of shards and slowly-released chemicals.

Bonaire is a remarkably tidy island. Compared to many other Caribbean islands, little trash is seen on the streets. Here and there a plastic bag will blow into and catch on the dry thorny trees. Yet, Bonaire has a serious marine debris problem on the beaches of the east side of the island. Where does this debris come from, if Bonaireans are so tidy?

The wind, the waves and other less tidy countries.

In an ideal world, Bonaireans could have a cup of coffee with those less tidy folks and politely ask that they keep their debris at home. But in the real world Bonaireans just ... clean it up.

The island of Bonaire has a profound commitment to conserving its natural resources. Residents, businesses, government and NGOs all note that the island's economy receives hefty support from visitors who come to view the Ramsar-designated wetlands, national park and marine protected area, iguanas, flamingos, other birdlife, and more. With the entire coastline a marine preserve of healthy reefs, a special emphasis of Bonaire tourism is scuba diving. And the healthy reefs found surrounding Boanire attract turtles: the endangered green and loggerhead turtles and the critically endangered hawksbill turtle.

These species also nest on the beaches of Bonaire. The same beaches where the debris ends up. Or at least they try to nest.

Which is one "why" behind the constant marine debris removal projects. Because if it doesn't get removed, the female turtles, driven to return to their natal beach, will have a tough time nesting, and the hatchlings, well, they have almost no chance of getting to the ocean through all that trash, nor avoiding the gulls and other predators that trash attracts.

Removing debris from nesting beaches is hard and tedious work, but there is no substitute for human labor. The Institute is pleased to have made this contribution to the conservation of turtles, other marine life, and the island of Bonaire.

We met so many generous people in the project. First we would like to thank the volunteers who donated a chunk of their vacation time. Truly an international group, we had volunteers from the Netherlands, Belgium, Argentina, Canada, and the US.

After cleaning, a "super highway of sand" that will help increase turtle nest success and hatchling survival.

After cleaning, a "super highway of sand" that will help increase turtle nest success and hatchling survival.

Above: Trucking debris to the landfill. This debris was pulverized from its long journey in the sea and could not be recycled. Below: Green turtle, returning to sea after nesting. Note clean and unobstructed sand. Photo credit - Mark Sullivan NOAA.

Above: Trucking debris to the landfill. This debris was pulverized from its long journey in the sea and could not be recycled.

Below: Green turtle, returning to sea after nesting. Note clean and unobstructed sand. Photo credit - Mark Sullivan NOAA.

IMG_5592C.jpg
Above both photos: Dedicated volunteers. Some worked in dive shops. Others gave up vacation time to make a difference on Bonaire.

Above both photos: Dedicated volunteers. Some worked in dive shops. Others gave up vacation time to make a difference on Bonaire.

We also thank the following Bonaire businesses, agencies, and NGOs for support and collaboration in this project:

Dive Friends Bonaire and their Debris-free Bonaire program - Thank you for bags, information and expertise on this project and for all the work you do.

Sea Turtle Conservation Bonaire - Thank you for expertise and bags and ongoing efforts.

Belmar Dive Shop - Three employees generously gave their time. Inspiring.

Selibon N.V. - waived landfill fees to support this project. Thank you.

Buddy Dive Resort - distributed event flyers. Thank you.

We hope to work with you again in the future.


2007-8 Management plan - Central Forest Reserve, St. Kitts and Nevis

In 2007 and 2008, Seventh Generation Institute staff completed a management plan for a new national park on the island of St. Kitts - the Central Forest Reserve. This park's 12,500 acres of cloud forest provide habitat for a number of threatened resident birds as well as important stopover habitat for migratory birds. It was designated a globally important bird area by BirdLife International as large-scale tourism development has fragmented and degraded most of the island's unprotected habitat. Equally important, the newly designated park protects several important cultural sites and the watershed that supplies a clean, stable water supply and flood control for the human population of this rugged volcanic island.

Collaborators in the project included local citizens who provided valuable information and ideas, OPAAL and the government of St. Kitts and Nevis.

Management plan Central Forest Reserve National Park

Above: Subsistence farm inside Central Forest Reserve National Park Below: Mist blows across upper elevations of Mount Liamuiga, the tallest point within the Central Forest Reserve

Above: Subsistence farm inside Central Forest Reserve National Park

Below: Mist blows across upper elevations of Mount Liamuiga, the tallest point within the Central Forest Reserve